finding needles in a haystack

by     /    October 20, 2009   

In preparation for my fall newsletter, I’ve continued to pour through the photographs I have taken over the past spring and summer, looking for the best ones to add to my online collection. It is quite a task! Over the months, I have photographed countless subjects: flowers, leaves, sticks, seeds, and so on. And each of these photo shoots might have anywhere from 10 to 30 variations: each image representing a subtle change in color, focus or mood. Choosing the best one out of all those options is an exhausting and time-consuming process! You have to go through each photo step by step, comparing them to each other, working with them, trying to see which has potential and which does not.

Slowly, you winnow out the less good ones, and are left with a smaller and smaller pile of the best photographs. Although this process is tiring, I enjoy it because it gives me a fresh perspective on my work. When you are deep in the middle of a photo shoot, it can be hard to really see what you’ve created. So I like to be able to step back, take some time, and let the photographs “ferment” a while. They never fail to surprise me. Photographs that felt uninspired at first begin to reveal hidden depths. And photographs that I loved the instant I took them can become even stronger and more focused. Below are a number of photographs I’ve been working on over the past few days:

Abstract of a fallen leaf

Abstract of a fallen leaf

Abstract of a sunflower

Abstract of a sunflower

Abstract of a fallen leaf

Abstract of a fallen leaf

Abstract of a sunflower

Abstract of a sunflower

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Comments on 'finding needles in a haystack'

Lukrecja  (October 20th, 2009):

nice photos

Roberta  (October 20th, 2009):

Nice work. I would imagine this would be your busiest time of year with all the new material being raked up across the country!

Otto K.  (October 20th, 2009):

Very nice. I particularly like that last one. And the first one reminds me of a potato chip.

Mark  (October 29th, 2009):

Impressive work Daniel. I couldn’t agree more with the fermenting process. Sometimes inspiration in the field is sometimes lost in the editing process, and later revealed again after some time.

So many times I come back from a shoot, go immediately to edit – and think “Why the heck did I shoot that?” 🙂